New Treatment Offers Hope for Australians Struggling with Debilitating Skin Condition

New Treatment Offers Hope for Australians Struggling with Debilitating Skin Condition

Who would have thought that a small pill could bring back a sense of normalcy to the lives of those with psoriasis?

Psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin condition, affects a significant percentage of the Australian population. For individuals like Don Flood-Warren and Gail Frew, it has been a source of embarrassment and discomfort for years. However, a new drug called deucravacitinib, recently listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, is offering hope for those with severe forms of the disease. With its promising results, it’s changing lives and renewing a sense of normalcy.

New Treatment Offers Hope for Australians Struggling with Debilitating Skin Condition

Don Flood-Warren, a disability pensioner from North Queensland, has been living with psoriasis for 15 years. It not only affected his physical appearance but also contributed to his depression. Being conscious and embarrassed about his ‘scaly bits’ prevented him from going out much.

Gail Frew, a 75-year-old woman from North Queensland, has been dealing with psoriasis for two decades. This skin condition created a block in her life, making it difficult for her to leave the house. The judgmental looks from others only exacerbated her feelings of embarrassment.

Psoriasis is a common skin condition in Australia, affecting an estimated 2 to 4 per cent of the population. However, for individuals like Don and Gail, it goes far beyond just a skin problem. Simple activities like going to the swimming pool or having children climb on their laps become sources of stress and avoidance.

Fortunately, there is no shortage of treatment options for psoriasis. These include topical creams, medicated light treatment, and oral or injected medications. However, a breakthrough has arrived in the form of a new drug called deucravacitinib, also known as Sotyktu. This drug has shown remarkable results and offers hope for those with severe forms of the disease.

Don and Gail, along with a small group of North Queensland patients, have been part of an early access program for deucravacitinib. They have reported a dramatic improvement in their condition and are thankful that a treatment option has finally shown positive results. They can now feel ‘normal’ again, free from the physical and emotional burdens of psoriasis.

New Treatment Offers Hope for Australians Struggling with Debilitating Skin Condition

  • Psoriasis affects an estimated 2 to 4 per cent of Australians
  • Don Flood-Warren and Gail Frew have struggled with psoriasis for years
  • A new drug called deucravacitinib, sold under the name Sotyktu, is now available
  • Both patients have reported significant improvement in their condition
  • Access to treatment can be challenging for regional Australians due to a shortage of dermatologists

Access to treatment for psoriasis can be a challenge, particularly for regional Australians due to a shortage of dermatologists. However, efforts are being made to improve access and ensure that communities have the opportunity to benefit from new medications. The recent listing of deucravacitinib on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme is a step in the right direction, offering hope and relief to Australians struggling with this debilitating skin condition.

New Treatment Offers Hope for Australians Struggling with Debilitating Skin Condition

By John Powell

John Powell is a general journalist with a strong focus on national politics. He pursued his studies at the University of Melbourne, where he honed his journalistic skills. With a keen interest in the political landscape, John has become a notable figure in reporting on national politics. His insightful coverage and analysis have garnered attention and respect from both colleagues and readers. With an eye for detail and a dedication to uncovering the truth, John continues to provide informed and balanced reporting on key political issues, making him a valuable asset in the field of journalism.